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CNBC

CNBC's 20th Anniversary Celebration

October 17–18, 2014

REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN.

 

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Exhibition October 10 – 26, 2014

NEURONS AND OTHER MEMORIES -

work in and around the brain

Curated by Patricia Maurides in collaboration with the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition

 

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Featuring investigations, translations and reflections by artists and neuroscientists.

Upcoming Events

09-03 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Pgh/London Consortium Lecture

09-04 12:00pm - 1:30pm
CBDR Seminar, Loss Aversion in the Field and Lab

09-04 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Pitt EpiBrain Neuroimaging Journal Club

09-08 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Guest speaker, David C Glahn, Ph.D

09-12 9:30am - 10:30am
Pitt Psych Research Seminar

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Shaw, Daniel

Shaw Professor and Chair, Psychology
University of Pittsburgh


Phone: 412-624-1836
Fax: 412-624-8827
Email: casey@pitt.edu

Ph. D., University of Virginia

Research Interests

My research interests are focused on examining the development and prevention of antisocial behavior and pathways to substance use from early childhood through young adulthood, as well as exploring extensions of an intervention approach for children transitioning to adolescence in relation to health outcomes (e.g., sleep, emotion regulation, physical activity). I am fortunate enough to be able to examine these issues using multiple data sets. All of the projects involve longitudinal designs, most of which were initiated in early childhood; three use an experimental design to test an efficacy of a preventive intervention, and two projects use a genetically informed design to examine gene-environment interactions. The most recent project also incorporate a neuroscience perspective, examining how genes, environment, and GxE interactions affect brain function, which in turn is hypothesized to affect risk for antisocial behavior and drug use during the early 20s. The sample includes a cohort of 310 low-income boys followed prospectively from infancy, with 20 years of data on socioeconomic, family, and child risk factors, allowing us to combine qualitatively rich assessments of children’s early environments with both genetic and brain function data.

Recent Publications

  • Shaw, D. S., Hyde, L. W., & Brennan, L. M. Early predictors of boys’ antisocial trajectories (in press). Development and Psychopathology.
  • Shaw, D. S., Dishion, T. J., Connell, A., Wilson, M. N., & Gardner, F. (2009). Improvements in maternal depression as a mediator of intervention effects on early child problem behavior. Development and Psychopathology, 21, 417-439, PMC2770003.
  • Shaw, D. S. (2009). Translational issues in the development and prevention of children’s early conduct problems: Challenges in transitioning from basic to intervention. In D. Cicchetti & M. Gunnar (Eds.), Meeting the challenges of translational research in child psychology, Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology Series research (pp. 273-314). Hoboken, NJ: Wiley & Sons.
  • Shaw, D.S., Dishion, T. J., Supplee, L. H., Gardner, F., & Arnds, K. (2006). A family centered approach to the prevention of early-onset antisocial behavior: Two-year effects of the family check-up in early childhood. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 74, 1-9.
  • Shaw, D.S., Gilliom, M., Ingoldsby, E.M., & Nagin, D (2003). Trajectories leading toschool-age conduct problems. Developmental Psychology, 39, 189-200.
  • Shaw, D.S., Bell, R.Q., & Gilliom, M. (2000). A truly early starter model of antisocial behavior revisited. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 3, 155-172.