Stephen J. Gotts

Postdoctoral Researcher
Dept. of Psychology
Carnegie Mellon University
& Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition
campus phone: (412) 268-1953 (Baker Hall 354 J, CMU)
e-mail: gotts@cnbc.cmu.edu

and

Laboratory of Neuropsychology, NIMH
National Institutes of Health
phone: (301) 496-5625 x-273 (Bldg 49, 6A56)
e-mail: steve@ln.nimh.nih.gov
Education:

1996-2002
Ph.D., Cognitive Neuroscience, Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA.
Dissertation: Mechanisms underlying enhanced processing efficiency in neural systems (supervised by Dr. D. Plaut). (download .pdf)
1990-1994
B.A., Summa Cum Laude, Psychology (minor: Computer Science), Trinity University, San Antonio, TX.
Senior Thesis: Neural network models of relative depth perception employing stereoscopic disparity (supervised by Dr. F. Bremner).

Research Interests:
My research is aimed at understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie the processing and representation of long-term perceptual and conceptual knowledge in neocortical regions of the brain. I use a combination of neural network modeling techniques (both biophysical and connectionist) in conjunction with behavioral experiments in order to formulate explicit theories about the relationship between neural processes and behavior. Current work is focused specifically on the ways in which attentional processes shape long-term learning, as reflected in phenomena of positive and negative repetition priming.

Recent Papers:
Martin, A. & Gotts, S.J. (2005). Making the causal link: frontal cortex activity and repetition priming. Nature Neuroscience, 8, 1134-5. (.pdf)

Gotts, S.J. & Plaut, D.C. (2004). Connectionist approaches to understanding aphasic perseveration. Seminars in Speech and Language, 25(4), 323-34. (.pdf)

Gotts, S.J. (2003). Mechanisms underlying enhanced processing efficiency in neural systems. Unpublished doctoral thesis, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA. (download .pdf)

McClelland, J.L., Plaut, D.C.,Gotts, S.J., & Maia, T.V. (2003). Developing a domain-general framework for cognition: What is the best approach? Brain and Behavioral Sciences, 26(5), 611-4. (.html)

Gotts, S.J. & Plaut, D.C. (2002). The impact of synaptic depression following brain damage: A connectionist account of "access" and "degraded-store" semantic impairments. Cognitive, Affective, & Behavioral Neuroscience, 2(3), 187-213. (.pdf)

Gotts, S.J., Incisa, A., & Cipolotti, L. (2002). Mechanisms underlying perseveration in aphasia: Evidence from a single case study. Neuropsychologia, 40(12), 1930-47. (.pdf)

Recent Presentations:
Gotts, S.J. & Plaut, D.C. (2005). Neural mechanisms underlying positive and negative repetition priming. Poster presented to the Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, New York, NY. (Poster)

Gotts, S.J. & Plaut, D.C. (2004). Neural mechanisms underlying positive and negative repetition priming [Abstract 226]. Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society. Proceedings of the 45th Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN. (Abstract)

Gotts, S.J. & Chow, C.C. (2001). Mechanisms underlying neural synchronization and improved efficiency in networks of spiking neurons: An account of the relationship between repetition suppression and behavioral priming. Poster presented to the Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA.

Gotts, S.J. & Chow, C.C. (2001). Repetition suppression, neural synchronization, and behavioral priming: Mechanisms underlying improved efficiency in networks of spiking neurons. Poster presented to the Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, New York, N.Y. (Abstract, Poster)

Plaut, D.C. & Gotts, S.J. (1999). Integrating semantic information despite synaptic depression: A connectionist account of "access" and "degraded-store" semantic impairments. Poster presented to the Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Washington, D.C. (Abstract, Poster)

Gotts, S.J., Incisa, A., & Cipolotti, L. (1999). The effect of rate of presentation and repetition on verbal perseverations in aphasia: Implications for priming accounts. Poster presented to the Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, Washington, D.C. (Abstract, Poster)

Gotts, S. & Plaut, D.C. (1998). A connectionist account of semantic impairments and the access/degraded-store distinction [Abstract 92]. Abstracts of the Psychonomic Society, 3, 9. Proceedings of the 39th Annual Meeting, Dallas, TX. (Abstract, Poster)


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