Mar
5
Tue
Pitt Neuroscience: Postdoc Candidate Seminar: Lee Vaasjo Munoz: ” Novel mechanisms in the specification and maintenance of cortical projection neuron identity” @ 219A Langley Hall
Mar 5 @ 11:00 AM – 12:30 PM

University of Pittsburgh Department of Neuroscience presents:

Speaker: Lee Vaasjo Munoz

Tulane University

Postdoctoral Associate candidate for the Chamberland Lab

 

Seminar title: “ Novel mechanisms in the specification and maintenance of cortical projection neuron identity”

 

 

Tuesday, March 5, 2024
219A Langley Hall

11:00 A.M. EST

Host: Dr. Simon Chamberland

 

 

NOTE: No virtual option will be provided.

Mar
6
Wed
Pitt Psych: Dissertation Defense: Alex M. Silver: Cognitive Mechanisms and Social Influences in Number Word Acquisition
Mar 6 @ 1:00 PM – 2:30 PM

Dissertation Defense

By

Alex M. Silver

Wednesday, March 6th at 1 p.m.

Murdoch Building: Room 424

Zoom link: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/94346973057 (password: pitt)

 

Cognitive Mechanisms and Social Influences in Number Word Acquisition

 

               Individual differences in symbolic math skills have consequences for academic, career, financial, and health outcomes in daily life. This dissertation will focus on the development of number word knowledge in early childhood, a foundational skill required for later symbolic math learning. In three studies I will chart the development of number word knowledge, test the cognitive mechanisms involved in learning number words, and explore the role of environmental influences in this process. Specifically, in Study 1 I will show that toddlers already possess some understanding of number words that allows them to identify a quantity corresponding to a number word, despite limited understanding of exact cardinal values. Study 2 then assesses the cognitive mechanisms responsible for supporting number word comprehension in children who are in the process of learning the meanings of number words. I demonstrate that toddlers may succeed at identifying number words because they rely on approximate representations of quantity of the Approximate Number System and the parallel individuation of the Object Tracking System. While the majority of toddlers show a preliminary comprehension of number words, there are already substantial individual differences in their performance. Study 3 examines the role of environmental influences in number word learning by exploring how parents’ engagement in math activities is related to toddlers’ number word comprehension. In the final portion of this dissertation, I provide evidence suggesting that variations in parents’ engagement in math activities with their toddlers may be one reason for these early differences in exact number knowledge. Altogether, this work contributes to our understanding of the developmental trajectory of number word acquisition, the cognitive mechanisms that underly this process, and the role of social influences in supporting number word acquisition.

 

 

 

 

 

Committee Chair and Advisor: Dr. Melissa Libertus

Mar
8
Fri
CNBC Postdoc Writing Group
Mar 8 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

CNBC Postdoc Writing Group

Fridays, 2-4pm

Contact: Andrew Gerlach (arg151@pitt.edu)

Location is typically Zoom: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/5307316889 (Passcode: 1234)

Description: Two hour block dedicated to writing papers, grants, reviews, etc. We use the Pomodoro system of 25 min blocks with 5 min breaks in between to chitchat.

There’s a group of ~10 people who attend semi-regularly. On any given week, it’s typical to have 3-5 people. It’s used for accountability and setting aside a dedicated chunk of time for writing (although some people use it for analysis or whatever else they may need to focus on). It’s also been helpful in building a postdoc community.

Please reach out to Andrew with any questions!

Mar
11
Mon
CNBC Brain Bag Spring Semester 2024
Mar 11 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

In-person MI 348 or 328; Zoom: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/93422291137

Mar
12
Tue
Pitt: Anesthesiology: Seminar: Mei-Chuan Ko: “Translational Value of Non-Human Primates in Opioid Research”
Mar 12 @ 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM

Please join us for a special seminar sponsored by

the Department of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine

and the Pittsburgh Center for Pain Research

 

 

Mei-Chuan Ko, PhD

Professor of Physiology and Pharmacology, Wake Forest University

Translational Value of Non-Human Primates in Opioid Research

Date:   Tuesday, March 12, 2024

Time:   12 noon – 1 pm

 

*************************

 

In person:        1495 BST Conference Room

Or

To attend virtually via Zoom, please contact Dr. Michael Gold at msg2@pitt.edu for the meeting link.

More information can be found at: Special Seminar: Translational Value of Non-Human Primates in Opioid Research – University of Pittsburgh

Mar
13
Wed
CMU: BME: Neural Engineering Virtual Seminar: Christoph Michel: “EEG micro states as a tool to capture brain network dynamics”
Mar 13 @ 3:00 PM – 4:00 PM
Mar
15
Fri
CNBC Postdoc Writing Group
Mar 15 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

CNBC Postdoc Writing Group

Fridays, 2-4pm

Contact: Andrew Gerlach (arg151@pitt.edu)

Location is typically Zoom: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/5307316889 (Passcode: 1234)

Description: Two hour block dedicated to writing papers, grants, reviews, etc. We use the Pomodoro system of 25 min blocks with 5 min breaks in between to chitchat.

There’s a group of ~10 people who attend semi-regularly. On any given week, it’s typical to have 3-5 people. It’s used for accountability and setting aside a dedicated chunk of time for writing (although some people use it for analysis or whatever else they may need to focus on). It’s also been helpful in building a postdoc community.

Please reach out to Andrew with any questions!

Mar
18
Mon
CNBC Brain Bag Spring Semester 2024
Mar 18 @ 6:00 PM – 7:00 PM

In-person MI 348 or 328; Zoom: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/93422291137

Mar
21
Thu
CMU: NI: Victor M. Bearg Neuroscience Lecture: John Krakauer: “Combining novel behavioral training with technology for neurological recovery”
Mar 21 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM

Please join us for the Victor M. Bearg Neuroscience Lecture.


Dr. John Krakauer
John C. Malone Professor of Neurology, Neuroscience, 
& Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Director of the Brain, Learning, Animation, and Movement Lab
The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine  

Thursday, March 21st
4:00 pm, Roberts Hall, Singleton Room
or join via Zoom:https://cmu.zoom.us/j/99764207187?pwd=Q0gwcUZwaGRuL2hvV3pqUTFWcEVRQT09 
Meeting ID: 997 6420 7187 
Passcode: 898767

_____________________________________________________________________

Combining novel behavioral training with technology for neurological recovery
It is becoming increasingly apparent from animal models and human studies that behavioral improvement in the setting of a neurological condition is a function of the dose, intensity, and type of training. Neurotechnology can be used to design new behavioral training experiences and approaches, and to physiologically augment the responsivity of the CNS to training for either neurorestorative effects or better neuroprosthetic use. These interactions between behavior, training and technology are of great interest for both scientific and clinical reasons.

About John Krakauer
Dr. Krakauer is currently John C. Malone Professor, Professor of Neurology, Neuroscience, and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, and Director of the Brain, Learning, Animation, and Movement Lab (www.BLAM-lab.org) at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is also an External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute and a Visiting Scholar at The Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown. He is Chief Medical Advisor to MindMaze. His areas of research interest are: (1) Experimental and computational studies of motor control and motor learning in humans (2) Tracking long-term motor skill learning and its relation to higher cognitive processes such as decision-making. (3) Prediction of motor recovery after stroke (4) Mechanisms of spontaneous motor recovery after stroke in humans and in mouse models (5) New neuro-rehabilitation approaches for patients in the first 3 months after stroke.(6) Philosophy of mind, philosophy of neuroscience.

Dr. Krakauer is also co-founder of the company MSquare Health (acquired by MindMaze) and of the creative engineering Hopkins-based project named KATA. KATA and MSquare are both predicated on the idea that animal movement based on real physics is highly pleasurable and that this pleasure is hugely heightened when the animal movement is under the control of our own movements. A simulated dolphin and other cetaceans developed by KATA has led to a therapeutic game that has been interfaced with an exoskeletal robot in a multi-site rehabilitation trial for early stroke recovery, and with motion tracking for cognitive therapy in the normal aged. Dr. Krakauer was profiled in the New Yorker in 2015 and his book, “Broken Movement: The Neurobiology of Motor Recovery after Stroke” was published by the MIT Press in the November 2017. He is slowly working on a new book on the mind and intelligence for Princeton University Press.  

If you are interested in meeting with Dr. Krakauer, please reach out to Aimee Dorney, adorney@andrew.cmu.edu.

Singleton Room is in Roberts Hall (labeled “REH” in cell C6): https://www.cmu.edu/visit/campus-map-april-2023

The easiest way to this space is to enter the main entrance of Hamerschlag Hall (marked “HH”) from The Mall, walk to the back of the building and take the stairs or elevator to “B level”. From there a short hallway takes you to Roberts Hall and the Singleton Room. 
[Note: To enter The Mall there are several paths. One is across The Cut from Forbes Ave, and another that may be convenient from Pitt is to pass straight through Porter Hall (“PH”) from Frew Street.]

Mar
22
Fri
CNBC Postdoc Writing Group
Mar 22 @ 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM

CNBC Postdoc Writing Group

Fridays, 2-4pm

Contact: Andrew Gerlach (arg151@pitt.edu)

Location is typically Zoom: https://pitt.zoom.us/j/5307316889 (Passcode: 1234)

Description: Two hour block dedicated to writing papers, grants, reviews, etc. We use the Pomodoro system of 25 min blocks with 5 min breaks in between to chitchat.

There’s a group of ~10 people who attend semi-regularly. On any given week, it’s typical to have 3-5 people. It’s used for accountability and setting aside a dedicated chunk of time for writing (although some people use it for analysis or whatever else they may need to focus on). It’s also been helpful in building a postdoc community.

Please reach out to Andrew with any questions!