This center leverages the strengths of Carnegie Mellon in cognitive and computational neuroscience and those of the University of Pittsburgh in basic and clinical neuroscience to support a coordinated cross-university research and educational program of international stature.


Events

Mar
21
Thu
CMNI Open Institute @ 348 Mellon Institute
Mar 21 @ 4:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Apr
1
Mon
Seminar: Hamel @ Langley Hall A219B
Apr 1 @ 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM

SEMINAR ANNOUNCEMENT

“NEUROVASCULAR COUPLING PHYSIOLOGY AND NEURODEGENERATIVE PATHOPHYSIOLOGY”

DR. EDITH HAMEL
PROFESSOR DEPT. OF NEUROLOGY AND NEUROSURGERY
MONTREAL NEUROLOGICAL INSTITUTE (MNI) AND MCGILL UNIVERSITY
(ABSTRACT BELOW)

MONDAY APRIL 1, 2019 AT 1:00PM
LANGLEY HALL A219B
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

Abstract:

Neurovascular coupling, the basis of brain imaging techniques that use hemodynamic signals as proxy for changes in neuronal activity, requires interactions between neurons, astrocytes and the microcirculation in order to adapt the need in glucose and oxygen to changes in neuronal activity either at baseline or following a given task or stimulus. In the cerebral cortex, depending on the stimulus, the changes in local cerebral blood flow result from activity changes in different populations of interneurons and pyramidal cells that act either directly or indirectly through perivascular astrocytes to orchestrate the resulting changes in perfusion. When cortical activity is modulated, mimicking conditions of either alertness (enhanced cholinergic tone) or pathology like Alzheimer’s disease (reduced cholinergic tone), the reliability of neurovascular coupling as a surrogate for changes in neuronal activity is altered or lost. Such unreliability is also found in animal models of dementia or cerebrovascular disease reminiscent to that of patients with vascular cognitive impairment and dementia, where age-dependent reduced hemodynamic signals fail to reflect changes in neuronal activity. Overall, the results underscore the selective role of different neuronal populations in modulating local cerebral blood flow in response to specific stimuli. Further, they highlight that caution is warranted in the use and interpretation of clinical brain imaging data in patients with cerebrovascular diseases. Funded by grants from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the Alzheimer Society of Canada and the Healthy Brains for Healthy Lives (HBHL) program of McGill University.

Apr
18
Thu
Neurobiology: Donnelly @ 6014 Biomedical Science Tower 3
Apr 18 @ 9:00 AM – 10:00 AM

Department of Neurobiology
Presents a Special Seminar:

“Pathobiology of neurotoxic protein inclusions in ALS and dementia”.

Christopher Donnelly, PhD
Assistant Professor,
Department of Neurobiology
Live Like Lou Center for ALS Research, Brain Institute
University of Pittsburgh

Thursday, April 18, 2019
9:00 AM
6014 Biomedical Science Tower 3
Seminar supported in part by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke of the National Institutes of Health (T32 NS086749)

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